What is the potential difference across the 10 ω resistor?

What is the potential difference across the 10 ω resistor?

The potential difference across the 10 ω resistor is 100 V.

The potential difference (voltage) is the electrical force pushing electrons through a resistor. In this case, there are 100 volts of force pushing electrons through the 10-ohm resistor.

This potential difference can be thought of as the “pressure” pushing electrons through the resistor. The higher the voltage, the greater the “pressure,” and the more electrons will flow through a given resistor in a given amount of time.

The potential difference across a resistor can be calculated using Ohm’s law: V = IR, where V is the potential difference, I is current, and R is the resistance. In this case, V = (1 A)(10 Ω) = 10 V.

The potential difference can also be thought of as the work done per unit charge: W = VQ, where W is the work done, V is the potential difference, and Q is the charge. In this case, W = (100 V)(1 C) = 100 J.

Thus, the potential difference across the 10-ohm resistor is 100 volts.

This means that 100 joules of work must be done to move 1 coulomb of charge through the resistor.

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